Two Evil Eyes (1990) – Review, Rating and Synopsis

Two Evil Eyes (1990)

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  • release Date:  1990
  • Genre:  Compilation of Shorts
  • Director:  Dario Argento, George A. Romero
  • Screenwriter:  Dario Argento, Edgar Allan Poe, Franco Ferrini, George A. Romero, Peter Koper
  • Cast & Crew: Adrienne Barbeau, Ramy Zada, Bingo O’Malley, Jeff Howell, E.G. Marshall, Chuck Aber, Tom Atkins, Mitchell Baseman, Barbara Byrne, Larry John Meyers, Christina Romero, Anthony Dileo Jr., Christine Forrest

Two Evil Eyes (1990)Rating:

  • Dylan = 7.5 / 10;
  • IMDB = 6.1 / 10;
  • Rotten Tomatoes = 3.5 / 10

 Two Evil Eyes (1990)Synopsis:

Maestro’s of horror George A. Romero (Dawn of the Dead) and Dario Argento (Suspiria) come together to bring two tales from the works of Edgar Allen Poe to screen. The First tale being The Facts in the case of M. Valdemar from Romero and the second tale being The Black Catfrom Argento.

Two Evil Eyes (1990) Review:

The Facts in the case of M. Valdemar is the first segment in the movie. It tells the tale of a woman Jessica Valdemar (Adrienne Barbeau) who is married to a rich older man Ernest Valdemar that is dying from a terminal illness. As she is having an affair with her husband’s doctor, she wants to take advantage of her husband’s illness by taking his assets and money for her benefit with the help of the doctor. Though things aren’t as simple as they seem when her husband suddenly dies of cardiac arrest and becomes a conduit for the forces from the beyond known as “The Others”.

The Black Cat is the second and final segment of the movie. It tells the tale of a crime scene photographer Rod Usher (Harvey Keitel) who is driven insane by a mysterious black cat that his girlfriend Annabel has adopted. Annabel is a professional violinist that teaches violin to students, she is also a more subtle and gentle person than Rod, who is more fierce and aggressive. The black cat can sense the negativity and distance in their relationship and strongly dislikes Rod, who himself can tell that the black cat doesn’t like him either and eventually strangles it. However this only worsens the situation when he becomes haunted by the black cat wherever he goes, causing him to commit gruesome crimes and leading to a shocking conclusion.

Directors John Carpenter and Wes Craven were originally meant to be a part of the movie but they pulled out at some point. This for me a disappointment because I consider them to be maestros of horror. Though overall I enjoyed both the tales, I enjoyed Argento’s take more than Romero’s tale. Romero’s tale had an interesting idea dealing with the beyond, though I found the pacing a bit off and the payoff not so good. Argento’s tale, in comparison, was more stylish with a slightly better pacing and a memorable conclusion.

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