The Babadook (2014) – Review, Rating and Synopsis

The Babadook (2014) - Review, Rating and Synopsis

The Babadook

The Babadook is a 2014 English language psychological horror movie directed by Jennifer Kent. The movie is produced by Kristina Ceyton, Kristian Moliere under Screen Australia, Causeway Films. When we consider the Casting of this movie, the lead roles are played by Essie Davis, Noah Wiseman, while the supporting cast includes Hayley McElhinney, Daniel Henshall. Coming to the Important Crew: Music is composed by Jed Kurzel, while Jennifer Kent has provided the screenplay.

  • Release Date:  2014
  • Genre:  Madness & Paranoia, Neo-monsters
  • Cast and crew: Essie Davis, Noah Wiseman, Hayley McElhinney, Daniel Henshall, Barbara West, Benjamin Winspear, Chloe Hurn, Jacquy Phillips, Bridget Walters, Annie Batten, Tony Mack, Carmel Johnson, Tiffany Lyndall-Knight, Lucy Hong, Sophie Riggs
  • Director:  Jennifer Kent
  • Screenwriter:  Jennifer Kent

The Babadook (2014) Rating:

  • Dylan = 9 / 10;
  • Eloise = 6 / 10;
  • Raoul = 8.5 / 10;
  • Andrew = 8 /10;
  • IMDb = 6.8 / 10;
  • Rotten Tomatoes = 9.8 / 10;

The Babadook (2014) Synopsis:

A widow raises alone her troubled young son who, after stumbling upon a strange book, gets obsessed with the idea that the book’s monster is after them.

The Babadook (2014) Review:

Despite a lot of coverage, this new Australian movie surprised pretty much everyone in the horror world… and for a good reason: The Babadook is creepy, original and surprisingly clever.

It is the brilliant combination of a spirited movie (like The Grudge or Mama) and a Shining-like psychological thriller. It is stressful and oppressive right from the start, bringing into action a couple of very atypical characters: a single mum deeply affected by the loss of her husband, and her disturbed and turbulent child. The monster/spirit apparition is very scary and mesmerizing. I think I haven’t felt that much psychological tension since The Others back in 2001, a movie to which The Babadook resembles in many aspects, especially the troubled profile of its characters.

The second half of the movie takes a psychological turn that I really didn’t expect. Thankfully, it is a clever one, at least once you understand it (and I had to read about it on the internet to be sure). This final makes the movie a unique one for sure, but I personally did not enjoy it as much as the first half. In my opinion, all story does not make perfect sense and lacked a proper conclusion, which is the only reason why The Babadook does not get an “excellent” grade from me. Other than that, the movie an exceptional one and probably this year creepiest release.

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