Mark of the Devil (1970) – Review, Rating and Synopsis

Mark of the Devil (1970)

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  • Release Date:  1970
  • Genre:  Witches & Occult
  • Director:  Michael Armstrong
  • Screenwriter:  Adrian Hoven, Michael Armstrong
  • Cast & Crew: Herbert Lom, Udo Kier, Olivera Katarina, Reggie Nalder, Herbert Fux, Johannes Buzalski, Michael Maien, Gaby Fuchs, Ingeborg Schöner, Adrian Hoven, Günter Clemens, Doris von Danwitz, and Dorothea Carrera.

Mark of the Devil (1970) Rating:

  • Dylan = 8.5 / 10;
  • IMDB = 6.2/10;
  • Rotten Tomatoes = 4.5/10.

Mark of the Devil (1970) Synopsis:

Udo is a young apprentice to a witch-finder who hunts down witches and executes them. Realizing that the church is a scam that falsely accuses people of being witches, he eventually rebels against his master.

 Mark of the Devil (1970)Review:

Mark of the Devil was made to cash in on the success of Michael Reeve’s (The Sorcerers) “Witchfinder General”. It is one of the most interesting and entertaining exploitation films that involve themes of devil worshipping, witchcraft and witch hunters.

The film is gruesomely graphics and features several scenes of extreme violence and torture scenes such as a girl’s tongue being pulled out her head, a woman being branded as though she was livestock, and a woman being burned alive to the crisp.

The film was considered to be so violent, that it had the tagline of “Positively the most horrifying film ever made” and sick bags were given to the audience in case you were sick because of how shocking the film was.

Udo Kier (Blade, Flesh for Frankenstein, Blood for Dracula and House on Straw Hill) puts on a superb performance as the witch-finder apprentice. A classic example in exploitation cinema at its finest, and a must-see for fans of Udo Kier and exploitation cinema.

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