European Horror Movies

Euro Horror Deep Dark Thoughts 

Wow, I just recently re-discovered the joys of the European horror movies scene. I probably have watched hundreds of European horror films, but none really made an impression on me until recently. Some may ask “what is Euro-horror”? The definition I use to define Euro-horror is quite simple, European Horror movies that came out of the European community in the late 60’s up through the early to late ’80s.

These films exhibit a lot of sex (especially lesbian) and nudity, a lot of gore, and especially a lot of alternative imagery. It is these ingredients that have attracted me to the genre and it pretty much serving as one of the only true new outlets for the horror that I find interesting today. I believe the internet will serve to educate many horror fans about these outstanding classic because it did for me and that is basically what I plan to do with this page.

Below is a sampling of the European horror movies that I have enjoyed watching. This is not to say that every Euro-horror movie I watch is an instant classic, but that these films have brought a rejuvenated freshness to my love of horror. Please, I am aware that many of you are more knowledgeable of these movies than I, so please e-mail me with suggestion and info that I might use to educate others, as well as myself. I will continue to add my suggested movies to this list on a regular basis. Thanks!!!!

Burial Ground Story

While investigating the magic practices of the ancient Etruscans, Professor Ayres (Raimondo Barbieri) unearths a ghastly discovery. When he heads back to the isolated crypt where he has been conducting his dig, he unwittingly revives the dead. As the dead rise from their graves to descend upon the living, the night of terrors begins.

The next day, a group of friends joins George (Roberto Caporali), his new wife Evelyn (Mariangela Giordano), and stepson Michael (Peter Bark), at their country mansion for a weekend getaway. Professor Ayres, who is nowhere to be found, had summoned them all there. So as they await his arrival, they decide to enjoy the solitude and beauty of their surroundings, but little do they know that the dead now walk.


As the frolicking continues, the ground beneath starts to give way to the resurrected Etruscans who are looking for their next meal. Horrified by the sight of these decaying corpses, the remaining guests make their way back to the villa and barricade themselves in. As night falls, they begin searching for answers, and a way out, while masses of armed zombies gather outside. Their chance finally comes when the undead overrun the house and they are able to take a break for a local monastery. But will they find sanctuary in these holy walls???

Also known as The Nights of Terror, Zombie Horror and Zombie 3, Burial Ground is pure cheese and easily a guilty pleasure of mine. You will either find yourself loving it or hating it because it is just that type of film. Sure, it isn’t Dawn of the Dead or Zombie, but in my opinion, it is a film that any self-respecting zombie fan should search out and watch. Andrea Bianchi directed this film and many have gone on record as citing it as the ultimate rip-off film in the Italian zombie genre. Sure, he tries to recreate many classic scenes from the films of Fulci and Romero, but I think this film is just paying homage to this sub-genre. Hack, maybe, but still highly entertaining. The atmosphere, gore, and zombies (a la the Blind Dead series) are more than adequate, although the soundtrack can be a little tedious at times. The special effects, provided by Fulci veteran Gino De Rossi (Zombie, The City of the Living Dead, House by the Cemetery), prove to be very effective for this low-budget zombie romp. Now, I have purposely left out one major and disturbing plot point, so not to spoil your viewing pleasure, but if you really need to know what it is, just read practically any other review of the film and I am sure it will be highlighted. Give this film a chance!!!!

 Cannibal Apocalypse

Cannibal ApocalypseIn a small theater in Rome, a parapsychology conference is shown underway. Center stage on exhibit is Helga Ulman (Macha Meril), a medium demonstrating her talents of telepathy. As she moves through the standard parlor tricks of any good psychic, she is struck by an overwhelming sense of pure evil emitting from a member of the audience. Falling in and out of a trance-like state, Helga seems to play witness to this person’s murderous past and hysterically warns, you have killed and you will kill again. Visibly shaken by these events, she promises to reveal the killer’s identity the next day. Later that night, she is viciously attacked and murdered by a cleaver-wielding madman, but not before her neighbor, jazz pianist Marc Daly (David Hemmings), is reeled into this deadly game.

After hours of questioning by the cops, Marc is released and returns to the scene of the crime. As he walks the chilling corridors of Helga’s apartment, he gets a strange feeling that he’s seen something vital, but can’t recall what it is. Later he meets up with news reporter Gianna Brezzi (Daria Nicolodi) and they both agree to work together in solving this crime, but will this partnership prove lethal??

As the chase continues, the killer always seems to be one step ahead of both Marc and Gianna, toying with them much as a cat does with its prey. Each lead brings more death as they move closer to revealing the killer’s identity. Finally, Marc realizes that the truth may be much closer than he originally thought, so he decides to return to the scene of the crime.

This film proved to be a turning point in the career of Dario Argento. After firmly establishing himself with such Giallo classics as The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, Cat O Nine Tails, and Four Flies on Grey Velvet, Dario was looking to expand his exploration into the nightmarish world that haunted his dreams. By confronting these demons, he could exercise them in a creative fashion. It is through this maturation process that we see the birth of Argento’s trademark visual stylistic approach. Deep Red also marked the first time Dario and Goblin worked together on a film soundtrack, and I know there isn’t a soul out there who will deny the power of this collaboration. As important as the images are in telling the story, and the music is in accenting the atmosphere, the melding of these two emotional media in a seamless harmony of darkness helped to produce an unparalleled masterpiece

Deep Red

Deep RedIn a small theater in Rome, a parapsychology conference is shown underway. Center stage on exhibit is Helga Ulman (Macha Meril), a medium demonstrating her talents of telepathy. As she moves through the standard parlor tricks of any good psychic, she is struck by an overwhelming sense of pure evil emitting from a member of the audience. Falling in and out of a trance-like state, Helga seems to play witness to this person’s murderous past and hysterically warns, you have killed and you will kill again. Visibly shaken by these events, she promises to reveal the killer’s identity the next day. Later that night, she is viciously attacked and murdered by a cleaver-wielding madman, but not before her neighbor, jazz pianist Marc Daly (David Hemmings), is reeled into this deadly game.

After hours of questioning by the cops, Marc is released and returns to the scene of the crime. As he walks the chilling corridors of Helga’s apartment, he gets a strange feeling that he’s seen something vital, but can’t recall what it is. Later he meets up with news reporter Gianna Brezzi (Daria Nicolodi) and they both agree to work together in solving this crime, but will this partnership prove lethal??

As the chase continues, the killer always seems to be one step ahead of both Marc and Gianna, toying with them much as a cat does with its prey. Each lead brings more death as they move closer to revealing the killer’s identity. Finally, Marc realizes that the truth may be much closer than he originally thought, so he decides to return to the scene of the crime.

This film proved to be a turning point in the career of Dario Argento. After firmly establishing himself with such Giallo classics as The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, Cat O Nine Tails, and Four Flies on Grey Velvet, Dario was looking to expand his exploration into the nightmarish world that haunted his dreams. By confronting these demons, he could exercise them in a creative fashion. It is through this maturation process that we see the birth of Argento’s trademark visual stylistic approach.

Deep Red also marked the first time Dario and Goblin worked together on a film soundtrack, and I know there isn’t a soul out there who will deny the power of this collaboration. As important as the images are in telling the story, and the music is in accenting the atmosphere, the melding of these two emotional media in a seamless harmony of darkness helped to produce an unparalleled masterpiece.

Let Sleeping Corpses Lie

George (Ray Lovelock), the young proprietor of an oddity shop which specializes in occult items, has packed up his things and decides to head off to the countryside for some much-needed rest. Along the way, his journey is interrupted when a young woman accidentally backs over his motorcycle at the local petroleum stop. Reluctantly, Edna (Cristina Galbo) agrees to give George a lift to Windermere so he can meet up with some friends.

Just as their adventure is about to come to an end, Edna asks George to make a quick stop at her sisters home in Southgate so that she can take care of some family business. One wrong turn later, the two find themselves lost and decide to stop by a local farm for some directions. While George makes his way up to the house, Edna waits nervously back at the car. Along the way, George becomes aware of high-pitch humming noise coming from a machine that he later finds out is being tested to kill insect and parasites.

Back at the car, Edna notices a strangely eerie figure making its way toward her and before she knows it, she is attacked by what seems to be a lifeless corpse driven only by in its lust to kill. Barely escaping Edna runs screaming into Georges’ arms and learns that her attacker was the recently deceased tramp known to the locals as Guthrie the Loony. With night approaching, they set off again for Edna’s sister home.

Elsewhere, Edna’s sister Katie (Jeannie Mestre), a drug addict who suffers from mental problems, witnesses the brutally murdered of her husband at the hands of Guthrie. Just as George and Edna arrive, a hysterical Katie confronts them with the gruesome details of this ghastly crime. As the police are called to the scene in steps a tough bigot Irishman, Inspector McCormick (Arthur Kennedy) who seems hell-bent on locking up Katie and any other hippie that gets in his way, but Edna, knowing that her sister is incapable of such an act, decides to seek out the truth. As their search leads them through the dusty crypts of the local cemetery, can they truly be prepared for what may be waiting for them at the Morgue???

This well-paced, highly imaginative, intelligent zombie-fest had gone undiscovered by most horror fans for many years and only recently has been introduced to the masses with Anchor Bays re-release. Harkening back to the social commentary of Night of the Living Dead, Spanish director Jordi Graus (Love Letters of a Portuguese Nun) own Let Sleeping Corpses Lie (aka The Living Dead at Manchester Morgue) plays on themes in the social, ecological, and political arenas while providing its viewers with a thrilling trip to the grave and back. If you are looking to enter the wonderful world of Eurohorror, while at the same time getting you greasy little paws on one of the top ten zombie films of all-time, pick up Let Sleeping Corpses Lie immediately!!!!

Tomb of the Blind Dead Story

This movie tells the story of three friends on their way to a weekend outing in Lisbon. One of the girls gets pissed off and jumps from the train they are traveling on. Left all alone in the wild frontier of Spain she looks for shelter and finds it in an old run down monastery. Unbeknownst to her, this is haunting grounds of the dead Knights of the Templar who have risen from their grave to seek revenge.

You see these knights are not your traditional horse riding and sword swinging types, but rather they are the undead bent on death and destruction. The rest is left to you, but you won’t be disappointed by the ending.

Directed by Armando DeOssorio this is one the creepiest Zombie movies I ever seen. It is not overly gory, but the imagery is outstanding. There were four other “Blind Dead” films made. I presently have three of the four but haven’t had the time to catch up on this series. “Tomb” has recently been remastered on laserdisc by the fine folks at Elite and on DVD and VHS by Anchor Bay. Treat yourself to some fine Euro-horror and see what you’ve been missing.

Demons Story

Demons The movie begins in Berlin train station as a mysterious masked man is passing out tickets for a movie premiere. As the people file in like lambs being lead to the slaughter, a cursed movie prop on display in the lobby helps to make this film more than just fantasy.

As the chilling words ” They will make cemeteries their cathedrals and the cities will be your tombs” echoes across the screen, the eeriness of this strange film quickly begins to come alive. Before they know it, the patrons find out that the terror they are watching is taking shape around them. Murderous demons begin ripping their way through the crowd, inflicting others into their bloodthirsty ways. The struggle continues as the moviegoers try to find a way out. But will anyone survive this night of horror???

Directed by Lamberto Bava and produced by Dario Argento. This is an instant classic from the first time you slip into the VCR. This along with Fulci “Zombie” and “The Gates of Hell” were probably my first exposure to Italian horror. The gore and makeup effects are outstanding.

City of the Living Dead

The gore is used so well and to the utmost effect as to drive the storyline home. When a priest has hung himself in a graveyard, he opens up the seven doorways to hell. A reporter (Christopher George) has three days to close these portals before All Saint Day or “the dead shall rise and walk the earth”.

Watch out for the famous drill scene. Only strong stomachs need to apply. “The Beyond”(AKA “7 Doors of Death” during its original US release) is considered a sequel to “The City of the Living Dead”. Click here for some great pictures from The City of the Living Dead

This movie is made by one of my all-time favorite directors, the late great Lucio Fulci. This is one of few movies that can be driven by gore (another is Fulci classic “Zombie“).

Cannibal Holocaust

The storyline focuses on a documentary team that is heading into the Amazon in search of a lost tribe of cannibals. The team isn’t heard from for weeks, so another anthropologist heads out in search of them. He later finds that the crew had been killed by the cannibals, but is able to recover their stock of film. He goes back to the states to do a documentary on the team and is a shock at what he sees.

Directed by Ruggero Deodato. I’ve never been into cannibal movies if you discount the “Texas Chainsaw Massarce“. I was pleasantly surprised by this film. It was very well made and wasn’t overly gory. This is not to say it wasn’t gory at all, no it had a lot of gore, but I was expecting a lot worse. Some people have asked if this is indeed a snuff film because the scenes are so realistic. Well, it isn’t and the only really disturbing parts of the film are the repeated acts of violence done to animals. If you watch this film, and I suggest you should, please be prepared. Otherwise, enjoy and please pass the yummy meat pies.

Aquarius

The story begins with the theater group practicing for their upcoming play. But this isn’t your average redo of “Oklahoma”, no this is more like “Jason meets Cats”. Oh, let not forget that murderer/actor “Irving Wallace” has escaped from a local asylum and decided to audition as the lead (HA HA).

After the murder of Irving’s first victim (costume girl), the director decides to lock his cast in for a dusk-to-dawn rehearsal of a play. He wants to re-work the plot trying to exploit the murder in hopes of driving business. Not so quick Mr. Director, it seems your players are dying to leave the show.

Soavi (“Cemetery Man“, and “TheChurch“). trained under the direction of Dario Argento and many of Argento’s techniques are evident in this film. But this isn’t just another case of student imitating teacher, but rather student exceeding the teacher. Soavi does an excellent job driving the tension is this exquisite gore feast. The imagery is outstandingly intermixed with the killings, taking the slasher genre to a new level.

Nekromantik

The story tells of Robert (Daktari Lorenz), a member of a street cleaning unit, the response for mopping up after major auto accidents. Robert has this strange fixation for body parts and likes to bring them home. His girlfriend Betty, who is just as sick as him, get turned on by Robert’s strange collection. One day Robert is giving the duties of bringing back a corpse found submerged in a lake, but instead of disposing of the carcass, he takes it home. Threesome…. corpse-style.

This new addition really ignites their sex life and the imagery is very disturbing. When “it” (i.e. the corpse) loses its “member” Robert replaces with a pipe. Wooh!!!! With one bizarre twist after another, Robert’s girl leaves him a dear John letter saying she has left with her one true love….the corpse. The ending is mind-blowing, to say the least.

There isn’t probably a more disgusting subject matter than necrophilia. You got to be one fucked up indiviual to want to have sex with a corpse. So with all this in mind, I decided to sit down and watch “Necromantik“. Being the nut I am I was prepared for the worst and hoping for it, and let me say I wasn’t disappointed. I really thought as I put this tape in the VCR, that I was in for some major trash, but I was wrong.

Sure the imagery and the storyline were outrages, as well as, exhilarating (but not in a sick way). J?rg Buttgereit’s film challenges the soul on some obscure level. “Necromantik 2” is next on my list. Can the sickness continue, I hope so!!!!!!

Twitch of the Death Nerve Story

Twitch of the DeathThe death of a wealth Countess (Isa Miranda) and the disappearance of her husband has left many unanswered questions in particular “who is the rightful heir to their valuable and much sought after bayside land?” In steps developer Ventura (Chris Avram), who upon hearing of the Countess’ suicide decides that the time may be ripe to close a deal that has been eluding him for years, but little does he know what dark forces swirl along the shores of this tranquil setting.

The scene quickly turns macabre as the body begins to rise. Four unsuspecting teens show up at the bay looking for a little sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll, but in the shadows lurks the eyes of a killer. When Brunhilda (Brigitte Skay) decides to takes a skinny dip alone, she uncovers the decaying body of the Count. As she runs screaming for help, she is viscously murdered along with her friends to hide the truth.

Greed can be such a strong motivating factor that it could turn any good person bad, but in this case, our cast of characters aren’t that good. First, we have entomologist Paolo Fosatti and his fortuneteller wife Angela (Laura Betti), whose passion for the environment could be deadly. Up next is Simon (Claudio Volonte), the bastard son from one of the Countess’ many extramarital affairs, who may want to stake a claim to his birthright. Than Renata (Claudine Auger), the Count’s daughter, and her husband Albert (Luigi Pistilli), whose disgust and anguish at seeing her dead father quickly turns to ambition, rather than revenge. Finally, we cannot over look Ventura, because he may be willing to do almost anything to close this deal. In the end, you may not even walk away from this one.

How many times have you heard “this is the one that started it all”?? Well, it couldn’t be truer then in the case of Mario Bava’s (“Blood and Black Lace”, “Black Sunday”) classic giallo “Twitch of the Death Nerve”. Many less-cultured and even less-educated horror fans unfortunately have fallen into the trap of crediting a film like “Black Christmas” with establishing the framework for the slasher sub-genre, but undoubtedly the influence of “Twitch of the Death Nerve” is unmistakable when watching these films. Sean Cunningham must have watched this film over and over again with formulating the violence in Friday the 13th, Parts I, II, and III. Bava, a true master on every level, brings a certain style to the “body count” film that has rarely been duplicated, with the exception of possibly John Carpenter’s “Halloween”. If you want to break through the stigma of the “American Slasher” genre, go back to the basics with “Twitch of the Death Nerve”.

Horror Rises from the Tomb Story

Horror Rises from the TombIt’s the 15th century and an unholy fear is sweeping across the land. Man no longer fears death, but welcomes it as an escape from the evil that has settled into his life. Mostly clouded and many innocent people are put to death at the hands of the Inquisition.

As this film begins, we do not find the innocent, but rather the guilty minions of the Dark Lord, who are being prepared to meet their maker. Ulric (Paul Naschy) and lovely wife (Cristina Suriani), an evil pair of sorcerers, have been condemned for their transgressions and now must pay the ultimate price with their lives. But before the executioner’s ax falls, Ulric pronounces a curse on his descendents and even the grave can’t stop him from seeking his revenge.

Fast forward to the present. During a sance, an evil spirit convinces four youths to visit their ancestral home in search of a treasure. Inspired by the thoughts of ancient riches, the four (lead by Naschy as Hugo) begin a journey that leads they towards a rendezvous with an unspeakable evil for the treasure they seek is actually the head of Ulric and the price to be paid will be in blood .

Through a deadly chain of events, Ulric’s head is brought back to his body and his curse begins to take shape. A possessed local (Luis Ciges) serves as Ulric’s minion, who sickles his way through any obstacle that would prevent this evil from resurrecting his wife. Now reunited, the duo raises a zombie army of the dead to finish what was started centuries before. But will they be successful in reaping their timeless revenge on mankind by summoning the Dark Lord or will the grave reclaim them forever????

I can’t believe this is the first film of Paul Naschy to be covered in the House of Horrors. Although I have been a fan of Paul’s for years and even had the pleasure of meeting this legend at the Fangoria Convention in NYC (1998), I am just coming to expand my appreciation for his work. “Horror Rises from the Tomb” has it all: great atmosphere, solid storyline, gore galore ( one memorable scene includes a graphic skin- ripping and heart removal with implied eating… well, at least in the uncut version), and a eerie score. This is a great film and one of my favorite by Naschy. I hope to cover more Naschy films in the future including my favorite “The Craving” (aka “El Retorno del Hombre Lobo”).

The House by the Cemetery Story

The House by the CemeteryA  professor (Paolo Marco), is joined by his wife ( Lucy…Catriona MacColl) and their young son, as he heads up to an old New England house to complete a project. This old house has a sinister past. Mostly recently the good professor’s colleague Dr. Peterson killed his mistress and later committed suicide while doing research there. All the while, young Bob (Giovanni Frezza) receives warnings from a little girl (Mae…Silvia Collatina) about their new home.

As the family settles into their new surroundings, Lucy starts to struggle with her sanity as strange things begin happening around her. A haunting noise, similar to that of crying child, can be heard emanating from the cellar, which mysteriously has been boarded shut. As Dr. Boyle continues to look deeper into Peterson’s research, he finds evidence that point to an evil surgeon, a Dr. Freudstein, who inhabited the same house 150 years earlier. He had been condemned for bizarre surgical experiments in his time, but what does Freudstein have to do with Peterson’s macabre demise???

True evil is finally released as the babysitter (Ania Pieroni) removes the boards from the cellar door. The gore flows heavily and freely as Freudstein struggles to keep himself alive after 150 years in his search for human body parts. Will the cemetery by the house be getting fuller???

The film definitely borrows heavily from the theme of the “The Shining” : a house notorious for death, a young boy who can speak with ghosts, and a man whom everyone believes he has been there before. But Lucio Fulci was able to add in enough of his own style to deliver a chilling tale that we should all celebrate. This film also marked the end of the Fulci/ Fabrizio de Angelis collaboration (“Zombie“, “City of the Living Dead” (aka “Gates of Hell”), “The Beyond“, and “NY Ripper”). This period definitely marked the peak of Fulci’s career, one unmatched by any other Italian director of his era. Lucio was and, in my mind, still is the “Italian King of Horror”.

The Day of the Beast Story

The Day of the BeastAfter trying for many years to decipher an ancient code that will unlock the secrets to the end of the world, Father angel (Alex Angulo) finally succeeded in pinpointing the exact date of the apocalypse. Awhile later in a dark and empty church, he confesses to his fellow brother (Saturnino Garca), his intention to commit “all the evil he can” in his crusade against the Devil. At first questioning the Father’s findings, the priest agrees to help, but just than a large stone crucifix falls crushing him. Father angel now knows that evil forces have already begun to work against him and that time is of the essence.

Before long the Father is committing sin with an unchristian-like zeal. He steals the luggage of a tourist, robs a beggar blind, pushes a mime off his perch, shoplifts from a store, and pinches the wallet from a dying man while telling him to “rot in hell”. The Priest hopes his evil ways will lead him down the path of forming a pack with Satanists, so that he may be present when the Beast reveals himself on Christmas day. He develops an instant friendship with an acid-dropping, heavy metal record store clerk named Josa Mara (Santiago Segura), who offers him a sanctuary in his family’s boarding house. After comfortably settling into his new lodging, he seeks some penance for his transgressions by burning the bottom of his feet with a hot cigarette.

While clicking through the stale air of late night TV, Father Angel realizes that only with the help of famed anti-evangelist Ennio Lombard (Armando De Razza) and his book “The Magic World of Professor Cavan” can he determine the birthplace of the demon. With assistance of Josa Mara and Ennio, the padre prepares for a battle of revelational proportions with the salvation of humanity at stake.

This film was released in 1995 and received 6 Goya awards (the Spanish equivalent of the Academy Award) with Alex de la Iglesia receiving one for best director. The reasons why “The Day of the Beast” succeeds are numerous, but the most apparent is de la Iglesia and Jorge Guerricaechevarraa witty script that plays on many of cinematic traditions of the antichrist balanced with a blasphemous dark approach. I was lucky enough to first stumble upon the genius of de la Iglesia a few years back when I watched “Accian mutante”. That film will its stylish view of the future, is equally entertaining and highly recommend as well. De la Iglesia is definitely a force to watch for within the genre and maybe someone who could help resurrect it.

Cannibal Ferox Story

The story centers around Gloria Davis (Lorraine De Selle), a NYU doctoral student working on her thesis “The Myth of Cannibal”. She contends that the “evil white man” concocted the cannibal legend to warrant the destruction of these South American tribes in the name of greed. So she and two of her friend heading off for the Amazon to do a little first-hand researcher.

Unfortunately for our heroes (well they are not really the heroes, I truly believe the cannibals are the heroes of this film), they meet up with Mike (John Morghen), a sadistic coke-addict, and the fun begins. It is Mike’s sadistic behavior that forces this normally friendly grubworm eating natives to revert back to their primitive cannibalistic ways. It is like that old say “once a cannibal ….always a cannibal”. There’s dismemberments (if you get my drift…ooch), new and unique body piercing, and the villains in the end instead of “getting their just desserts”, become just dessert.

Touted as the most violent movie ever made and I would have a hard time disputing that. Directed by Umberto Lenzi (“Nightmare City” aka City of the Walking Dead), this gut-wrenching classic is “not” for the weak stomached. “Cannibal Ferox”, along with “Cannibal Holocaust“, ranks as one of the best cannibal movies ever shot. If you are against violence against animals be fore warned. But overall, this is a fun movies. It is so unbelievable that you have to laugh after tossing up your lunch. Puking has never been more fun.

Euro Horror Movies Fanspeak

Name: Jeremy Lunt

Email: [email protected]

RE: Eurohorror

I enjoyed your Eurohorror section very much, as well as your page in general. I think that many fans don’t realize how lucky they are to live in the USA, which has probably the most leniant restrictions on films in the world. Movies like EVIL DEADDAWN OF THE DEADZOMBIEGATES OF HELLTHE BEYOND, and others are virtually impossible to find in uncut forms (if at all) in many nations. Case in point: a friend of mine from Norway visited last summer and we watched DAWN OF THE DEAD. He was so impressed that he wanted to buy a copy to take home with him, but he was unable to get it past customs. God bless the Constitution!!!!!!!!!

Jeremy


Name: Giga Bastard

Email: [email protected]

RE: The Gates of hell

I recall the first night I ever saw a film by Lucio Fulci. I read about Fulci constantly in my favorite horror film mag, he was always given high praise for his films filled with disturbing imagery. One night, I went to the video store that I haunt looking for a good horror film. Being the horror enthusiast that I am, I’ve seen just about every one of the films they had in stock, but I was always hesitant about renting The Gates of Hell. I was curious about the film, constantly reading the back, but never took it home. I felt there was some force keeping me from renting it.

Anyways, this night I sucked in my gut and rented it. Man!! What a roller coaster ride that was. In all of the years I’ve been alive I had never found a horror film that truly scared me, besides The Exorcist in which I was 12 yrs old when i saw it, I found one. Not only did it scare me it stayed in my mind. I’m not a very religious person, but later that night after watching that I started to wonder if i was going to burn in hell for viewing it. This movie frightened me so that I felt I had to talk to god about it. So, now I’m a huge Fulci fan. I found someone who could actually scare me. I still watch the Gates of Hell, I handle it better, but man do I twitch in my chair through most of it.

Giga