The original titles for Night of the Living Dead was Night of the Flesh Eaters, but they changed it at the threat of a producer who already made a film by that name. Actually, the movie disturber gave the film its' final name.

The film also carried the title of Night of Anubis during filming only to be changed as referenced above. Anubis is the god of embalming/mummifying in the ancient Egyptian religion.

In the original treatment of the script, Barbara (Judith O'Dea) was to have survived the night.

Black & White film stock was not used to add atmosphere, but for economic reasons. Color was used in the beginning, but later dropped for the aforementioned reason.

Romero has stated that the initial idea for Night of the Living Dead was inspired by Richard Matheson's book, "I am Legend".

The goodies (i.e. entrails, meat, etc) were supplied by a butcher who was an investor in the film.

Night of the Living Dead"is directly responsible for the ad vocation of the Midnight Movie.

In the original script, the character of Ben (Duane Jones), was a much harsher man. He was your stereotypical truck driver. The character was changed for Duane Jones.

The budget for this film was $114,000.

If you look carefully you will notice numbers on the boards Ben is using to board up the house. This was done to help with continually, so that when the boards were taken down at the end of shooting they would go back in the same place the next day. Unfortunately, sometime the boards were put on backwards and that is when the numbers are evident.

Other blood is actually Bosco chocolate syrup.
(imdb)

When the zombies are eating the bodies in the burnt-out truck they were actually eating roast ham covered in chocolate sauce. The filmmakers joked that it was so nausea inducing that it was almost a waste of time putting the makeup on the zombies, as they ended up looking pale and sick anyway.
(imdb)

During the filming of the cemetery sequence, shot on two separate days, an unexpected accident caused a fast change of script. The car driven by Barbara and Johnny into the cemetery was actually owned by the mother of Russell Streiner. Unfortunately, sometime between the two filming sequences, someone ran into the car and put a dent in it that would easily be visible on camera. George A. Romero rewrote the scene so the car would come to a stop by crashing into a tree.
(imdb)

Tom Savini was originally hired by George A. Romero to do the makeup effects for this film. The two were first introduced when Savini auditioned for an acting role in an earlier film that never got off the ground. Romero, remembering that Savini was also a makeup artist (he had brought his makeup portfolio to show to Romero at the audition), called Savini to the set of his horror movie. However, Savini was unable to do the effects, as he was called to duty by the U.S. Army to serve as a combat photographer in Vietnam.
(imdb)

First horror film to have an African-American (Duane Jones) playing a lead role.
(imdb)

Bill 'Chilly Billy' Cardille, who played the television reporter, was indeed a local Pittsburgh TV celebrity. Known as "Chilly Billy" Cardille, he hosted a horror movie program on Channel 11 and occasionally reported the news.
(imdb)

Columbia Pictures was the only major Hollywood studio interested in distributing this film, but eventually passed because it was in black-and-white at a time when movies had to compete with new color televisions. Ironically, Columbia did distribute the 1990 color remake. American International Pictures (AIP) considered releasing the film, but wanted George Romero to shoot an upbeat ending and add more of a love story subplot.
(imdb)

Actor/co-producer Karl Hardman (Harry Cooper, the father in the basement), also served as makeup artist, electronic sound effects engineer, and took the still photos used for the closing credits.
(imdb)

The extras who played the zombies were paid $1 and a t-shirt that said "I was a zombie on Night of the Living Dead".
(imdb)

George A. Romero has readily admitted that Herk Harvey's Carnival of Souls (1962) was a big influence in his making of this film.
(imdb)

The main house did not have a true basement but a dirt "potter's" cellar, and thus had no long staircase leading down to it. The basement scenes were filmed in the editing studio's cellar.
(imdb)

The word "zombie" is never used.
(imdb)

The music used in the film was from a Capitol Records Hi-Q stock music library, and cost the filmmakers $1500. It was originally used in Teenagers from Outer Space (1959).
(imdb)

One of the Walter Reade Organization's publicity stunts was a $50,000 insurance policy against anyone dying from a heart attack while watching the film.
(imdb)

The film's world premiere was at the Fulton Theatre in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on 1 October 1968 (At 8PM, admission by invitation only). The film was met with a standing ovation.
(imdb)

The Evans City Cemetery was the cemetery used in the original version of the film.
(imdb)

The house used for this film was loaned to the filmmakers by the owner, who planned to demolish it anyway, thereby ensuring that they could do whatever they wanted to the house.
(imdb)

While writing the script, George A. Romero and John A. Russo were trying to think of a manner in which to destroy the zombies. Marilyn Eastman joked that they could throw pies in their faces. This is obviously an inspiration for the pie fight scene in this film's sequel, Dawn of the Dead (1978).
(imdb)

The calendar in the farmhouse kitchen is for December 1966.
(imdb)

According to the George A. Romero commentary track on the Elite laserdisc and DVD version of the film, the original working print and working elements and materials for the film no longer exist - they were destroyed as a result of a flood that filled the basement where the materials were stored (which was the same basement used in the movie).
(imdb)

One of the original ideas for the script before its many revisions called for Barbra to be a very strong, charismatic character. Instead, Romero and the producers loved Judith O'Dea's portrayal as a catatonic and terrified young girl much better, and hence edited the script to accommodate the part. Eventually, the idea of Barbara being a strong, central character would be revisited in Tom Savini's 1990 remake.
(imdb)
 

 
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